Pattern Feature & Sale Week: Rolling Thunder Styling

Over the next few months Holla Knits will host Pattern Feature & Sale Weeks! Each week a new Holla Knits design will be 50% off and the designer will do something special to show that design in a new light. 

Next up is Laura McDougal and her Rolling Thunder pattern!
Grab Rolling Thunder for 50% off – $3! This week only.

Rolling Thunder by Laura McDougal

Rolling Thunder by Laura McDougal

From designer Laura McDougal: One of the things I love about this design it its versatility. You can do just about anything with Rolling Thunder – you can make it the star of the show or use it as a cute accent to any outfit. A lot of fashion blogs from the past two weeks have been full of celebrity cool kidz at Coachella. The general style choices made me think of Rolling Thunder instantly – it would be right at home!Rolling Thunder Festival Babe

You can layer up for chilly nights or rock it on its own (with mandatory flower crown) for maximum music festival enjoyment.

Speaking of layers – I love using my sweaters as a dress topper in the summer. I’m a big walker (read: FitBit nerd) and get really toasty on my way to meet up with friends. The minute I walk into air conditioning, though, I go from sweaty mess to popsicle! Rather than dragging around that Target cardigan, why not show off your Rolling Thunder over drinks?

Rolling Thunder Dress Topper

 

So many dress and shoe combinations, so little summer!

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Pattern Feature & Sale Week: Rolling Thunder

Over the next few months Holla Knits will host Pattern Feature & Sale Weeks! Each week a new Holla Knits design will be 50% off and the designer will do something special to show that design in a new light. 

Next up is Laura McDougal and her Rolling Thunder pattern!
Grab Rolling Thunder for 50% off – $3! This week only.

Rolling Thunder by Laura McDougal

Rolling Thunder by Laura McDougal

Rolling Thunder: A yoke sweater with southwestern motives inspired from a vintage pattern. Stranded, intarsia colorwork is worked on the shoulders of the yoke, 3⁄4 length sleeves with K1 P1 ribbing and a slight boat neck. There’s a look and feel to the 1940’s southwest that I love in vintage clothing – earth tones with bright pops of color. I chose acrylic because I like sweaters you can wear against your skin in nicer weather.

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Pattern Feature & Sale Week: Fair Isle SHORTS!

Over the next few months Holla Knits will host Pattern Feature & Sale Weeks! Each week a new Holla Knits design will be 50% off and the designer will do something special to show that design in a new light. 

Next up is Emily Ringelman and her Fair Isle PANTS! pattern!
Grab PANTS! for 50% off – $3! This week only.

Emily Ringelman's Fair Isle Pants!

Emily Ringelman’s Fair Isle Pants!

From designer Emily RingelmanSo you’d like to make some shorts. That’s great! I’m all about knitted bottoms. I have two pairs of knitted shorts now and I seriously love them and wear them all the time. Modifying pants into shorts is super easy! Here’s how I did it.

Fair Isle Shorts!

Fair Isle Shorts!

First, yarn. My main color is Knit Picks Swish in Squirrel Heather, and I used just about 3 skeins. My colors are all Cascade 220 Superwash. The pinks are something I had leftover from a long ago project, and I had the green because I’m completely obsessed with that color of green. Love it when leftover yarn is exactly what you need.

So Cute!

So Cute!

I made the size M, which is the same as my pants. I wanted my shorts to sit a little lower on my hips than my pants do, so I worked one fewer round between each hip increase. Otherwise I knitted them to the pattern up until the leg divide.

Fair Isle Bootie!

Fair Isle Bootie!

Once I got to the leg divide, I measured a pair of lounging shorts that I like to determine how long of an inseam I wanted. It was 1.5″ (which sounds totally scandalous, but is definitely not). That meant that I needed to work just one more motif. After that motif, I worked some short rows across the back of the legs, to be sure that my booty was completely covered. In hindsight, I wish I had worked only two sets of short rows, because the back legs dip a little lower than I intended, but it’s not a big deal. I started the short rows at the middle of the crotch, and worked the first short row all the way to the side of the shorts. I did three sets of short rows, each set with one unworked stitch between wrapped stitches. After the last short row, I knitted 6 rounds in stockinette, making sure to pick up all the wraps, then did 5 rounds in garter. On the first purl round of the garter section, I purled 10 stitches, then purled two stitches together, all the way around the leg. I’ve found that garter stitch flares out on the bottom of shorts, so I figured that fewer stitches = less flare. Then I just bound off fairly loosely and ta da! Shorts. Much more practical for me!

If you, like me, live in the swamp (or somewhere equally as hot), I hope you’ll make your own Fair Isle SHORTS! You still get to wear knitted stuff but you don’t die of heat stroke. Win-win.