Category Archives: Fall/Winter 2013

Pattern Feature & Sale Week: Rolling Thunder Styling

Over the next few months Holla Knits will host Pattern Feature & Sale Weeks! Each week a new Holla Knits design will be 50% off and the designer will do something special to show that design in a new light. 

Next up is Laura McDougal and her Rolling Thunder pattern!
Grab Rolling Thunder for 50% off – $3! This week only.

Rolling Thunder by Laura McDougal

Rolling Thunder by Laura McDougal

From designer Laura McDougal: One of the things I love about this design it its versatility. You can do just about anything with Rolling Thunder – you can make it the star of the show or use it as a cute accent to any outfit. A lot of fashion blogs from the past two weeks have been full of celebrity cool kidz at Coachella. The general style choices made me think of Rolling Thunder instantly – it would be right at home!Rolling Thunder Festival Babe

You can layer up for chilly nights or rock it on its own (with mandatory flower crown) for maximum music festival enjoyment.

Speaking of layers – I love using my sweaters as a dress topper in the summer. I’m a big walker (read: FitBit nerd) and get really toasty on my way to meet up with friends. The minute I walk into air conditioning, though, I go from sweaty mess to popsicle! Rather than dragging around that Target cardigan, why not show off your Rolling Thunder over drinks?

Rolling Thunder Dress Topper

 

So many dress and shoe combinations, so little summer!

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Pattern Feature & Sale Week: Rolling Thunder

Over the next few months Holla Knits will host Pattern Feature & Sale Weeks! Each week a new Holla Knits design will be 50% off and the designer will do something special to show that design in a new light. 

Next up is Laura McDougal and her Rolling Thunder pattern!
Grab Rolling Thunder for 50% off – $3! This week only.

Rolling Thunder by Laura McDougal

Rolling Thunder by Laura McDougal

Rolling Thunder: A yoke sweater with southwestern motives inspired from a vintage pattern. Stranded, intarsia colorwork is worked on the shoulders of the yoke, 3⁄4 length sleeves with K1 P1 ribbing and a slight boat neck. There’s a look and feel to the 1940’s southwest that I love in vintage clothing – earth tones with bright pops of color. I chose acrylic because I like sweaters you can wear against your skin in nicer weather.

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Pattern Sale & Feature Week: Everett Henley Cardi!

Over the next few months Holla Knits will host Pattern Feature & Sale Weeks! Each week a new Holla Knits design will be 50% off and the designer will do something special to show that design in a new light. 

Next up is Emily Ringelman and her Everett Henley pattern!
Grab Everett Henley 50% off – $3! This week only.

From designer Emily RingelmanModifying this pullover into a cardigan was actually quite easy. Almost any top-down sweater can be modified into a cardigan, provided the original design doesn’t have some sort of front central panel. Vistoire, for example, would not work as a cardigan. But luckily, Everett does!

So CUTE!

So CUTE!

Here’s what I did:

I followed the pattern up until the point when you cast on 4 and join to work in the round. I just didn’t do that and kept working back and forth.

In hind sight, I would do things a little differently. I think I would have worked from the pattern until the front chart was complete, then I would have cast on 8 sts on each side of the front to add another lace repeat. That would make the neckline a little flatter across the very top. As is in my cardigan, the neckline is a little V-necky, but not really- it’s sort of an odd shape. Casting on more stitches would make it a little more scoop necky.

Instead of the curved lower hem, I just did a couple inches of 2×2 ribbing.

Collar: I picked up about 2 stitches for every 3 rows along the neckline, then one stitch in every cast-on stitch. Couple of rows of 2×2 ribbing, done.

Button bands: Along the front edges, I picked up a multiple of 4 plus an extra 2 stitches, which worked out to be about 2 stitches for every 3 rows. I worked 2×2 ribbing, beginning and ending with 2 knit stitches. I did the button band first, then sewed the buttons on equally spaced, then I used the button locations to knit buttonholes on the buttonhole band.

Yay Cardi!

Yay Cardi!

And lastly, I wanted to share two finishing tips that have really made my handknits look much less “homemade.”

For way more professional looking bind offs in the round, I always use method #3 from this TECHkitter tutorial. It’s great for sleeve cuffs, the bottom edge of a top-down sweater, etc.

I recently discovered this tip from Ysolda about preventing “ears” when binding off, and I’ve been using it every time. Much, much better edges on things like the collar of my cardigan.

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